Assignment discovery carbon dating artifacts

“I agree with one of the possibilities raised by the authors, that the radiocarbon dates come from under a restored sector of the eastern wall of the spring tower.

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For hundreds of years after the fall of Rome, hunks of marble were hacked off the map for building material. In 1562, Cardinal Alessandro Farnese made a valiant attempt to collect the surviving sections.

The radiocarbon dates only mean that this could not have been done before the late 9th century. “In any event, a late 9th century date should come as no surprise, as there are other indications for the growth of the city at that time – from the Temple Mount (in my opinion the original location of the mound of Jerusalem) to the south, in the direction of the Gihon spring,” says Finkelstein.

"Archaeology is the science of rubbish." -archaeologist Stuart Piggot The Forma Urbis Romae may just be the world's biggest jigsaw-puzzle.

As part of ongoing cooperative research projects with the IAA, Dr.

Elisabetta Boaretto, head of the Weizmann Institute of Science’s D-REAMS Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory and track leader within the Max Planck-Weizmann Center for Integrative Archaeology and Anthropology, was on the forefront of the radiocarbon dating analysis.

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