Validating a survey instrument

"Non-testable" means that the research question cannot be answered by performing a statistical test.The answers to these questions might be important to know, but the decision making criteria does not involve a statistical test.It is perhaps more important to ask questions that involve decision making criteria.Business research usually seeks to answer one or more testable research questions.The null hypothesis is created from the hypothesis by adding the words "no" or "not" to the statement.For example, the null hypotheses for the two examples would be: There is no significant relationship between a customer's age and their level of satisfaction with the service.Examples of non-testable research questions are: What do customers feel is fair price for the new product? How do customers feel about the quality of our products?What are employee's attitudes towards the new management? Respondents' answers to these questions can be summarized in descriptive tables and the results might be extremely valuable to administrators and planners.

When you say that you "fail to reject the null hypothesis", it means that you do not have enough evidence to claim that the null hypothesis is wrong.

Business and social science researchers often ask non-testable research questions.

The shortcoming with these types of questions is that they do not provide objective cut-off points for decision-makers.

Nearly all testable research questions begin with one of the following two phrases: Is there a significant relationship between a customer's age and their level of satisfaction with the service?

Is there a significant difference between the level of male and female satisfaction with the service?

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